wp0629ab4c.png
wp72e5ba76_0f.jpg
wpe7fb6ccd.png
wp2facc0d5.png

 © 2012 AID AFRICA  UK Registered Charity Number 1116336

wp8895f4f3.png
wp05434c4e.png
wp8e4c5e1f.png
wpb138fee7.png
wp6d699af9_0f.jpg
wpf4c36e60.png
wp6185648a_0f.jpg
wp040efae5.png
wpe30d62f8.png
wp63eeeff3.png
wp83dca9c8_0f.jpg
To help those at risk,  Aid Africa/OHP buys in
maize at harvest when it’s readily available, and
at its cheapest, to store for the “hunger months”
Christmas to March, when food is most scarce.  
In the past we’ve tried to grow enough, but have
proven it’s more reliable and economical
to buy it in

Having acquired 15 tonnes of maize (2012), we rented a maize mill for two weeks, and the whole process:- buying, milling, transporting back to our Centre, drying, measuring moisture content, weighing & packing takes 3-4 men more than 6 hard weeks to complete.

We use special bags to protect grain from the invasive weevils, endemic in this area. These bags have triple skins, preventing any air transfer, so actually suffocate the weevils without the need for traditional toxic chemicals.

Distribution of maize begins at Christmas each year. Hundreds assessed as most vulnerable and at greatest risk, benefit. Many others are helped too with token amounts.  The maize stored would provide the basis for about 50,000 meals.
wpaaf3663a_0f.jpg
wp226d67ce.png
wp6b02c98c.png
Working against hunger ....
Our site in Chiringa, set amid the foothills of Mt Mulanje,
with the inevitable poor soil, is in the process of setting
high standards of productivity and  best practice.

We choose to be fertiliser-free as local subsistence farmers
could never afford expensive chemicals, and we aim to train and encourage them into much higher crop yields.  We do this by focusing on soil, and its improvement, and are training in a well-proven agricultural scheme -“Farming God’s Way”.
wp889d6471.png
Our gardens produce vegetables:- mustard, chinese cabbage, soya, tomatoes, onions, peas, cassava, amaranthus (local indigenous crop), rape, and animal food
wpd7e00ec5_0f.jpg
wp575047ce_0f.jpg
An elderly widow receives mustard
  grown in our
       garden
wp6a164536_0f.jpg
This initiative, particularly successful in the tropics, discourages tilling, promotes the manufacture and use of compost, requires specific planting and care patterns, and advocates blanketing the soil with layers of humus - thus minimising soil erosion, increasing water retention, and charging the soil with valuable nutrients and structure.
Preparing compost
wpd5922654.png
wp82fd5d1b_0f.jpg
wp6c7d6b55.png
Hunger is the No.1 challenge in the remote areas of southern Malawi.
90% of our neighbours are subsistence farmers - working hard in their barren fields trying to feed their families, but if you’re elderly, sick or disabled and can’t dig, just survival is a daily challenge. There’s no welfare, no benefits, no help, so the vulnerable suffer.
wp3424f47a_0f.jpg
WE PLANT TWO KINDS OF “GARDENS”
depending on water availability

RAIN-FED: planted in November with the annual rains. These are larger fields, often way out in the Bush. Here we plant maize or sorghum - the staple dietary crop, and legumes (red beans, soya or pigeon peas) to fix nitrates back into the soil.
IRRIGATION: planted in winter (Apr/Jun), harvested July/Oct - usually vegetables, but sometimes maize if enough moisture is still present in the soil or there is adequate water close-by.
Volunteers grow, harvest and distribute to the vulnerable.
wp0c0d7b8c_0f.jpg
WATER is a major challenge -
Malawi has just 1 rainy season a year - usually from November to about February - then little else for 9 months.

If this fails, then local food resources also fail. This has been the case for many years
wpa47027bb.png
wpef309624.png
wp1d6db06a_0f.jpg
Breeding rabbits to distribute into the community for fast food for the particularly vulnerable, can also become a micro-business for them.
We had been raising chickens as improver stock for local farmers, but the outcome proved poor so stock was eventually given away to the needy.
Since 2009, we’ve been growing moringa.  Nutritionally it’s amazing!
Its leaves contain high levels of vitamins, calcium, protein, minerals, and iron, and its seeds are rich in oil.  
It’s fast growing, allegedly drought resistant when established and excellent for water purification — no wonder it’s dubbed
“The Miracle Tree”.
wp9fb08aae.png
wp39e6c4bd.png
Our Projects
wp1eb8cee2.png
Monthly distribution takes place 3 times - at Christmas, mid- January and mid-February.



We have also supplied a nursery school in the remote areas with maize all year round for the children’s lunch - it might be the only meal these children have that day.



The next maize harvest is due in March - its success depends largely on the volatile climate - the twin extremes of drought and flooding in the abrupt rainy season often cause crop destruction in many areas.